This calculator is to be used for estimations only.

Every pet is unique on the amount of food needed.

Pet's Name *

Ideal weight *

Dog's age (in months) *

Dog food formulation *

*In order to support lean body mass in overweight pets, feed your pet according to their TARGET bodyweight, not their current bodyweight. Combine with exercise (energetic play) to burn calories and reduce excess weight.

Guide

Puppy Care Guide

INTRODUCTION

A SMOOTH LANDING

CHOOSING THE RIGHT PRODUCTS

CREATURE COMFORTS

HOUSEBREAKING

SAFETY FIRST

PLAYTIME, EXERCISE & SOCIALIZATION

NUTRITION

SWITCHING YOUR PET’S FOOD

KEEPING YOUR PET HYDRATED

DOCTOR’S ORDERS

DENTAL CARE & GROOMING

INTRODUCTION

CONGRATULATIONS ON BECOMING A PET PARENT!

Ok, we know it’s not a real baby, but at least for the first couple of weeks, your new dog, whether a puppy or full grown adult, will need as much attention as the real thing. If you’re already a parent,you know what that means, and if you haven’t had a baby yet, caring for your new pooch will be great practice.

A new dog is tons of fun, but it also takes a little bit of effort, patience and love to care for them. Although we don’t claim to know it all, we do have a few tricks up our sleeve that may help you get a head start.

First things first – if you have any questions or concerns regarding the health or development of your new dog, contact a trained professional (e.g. a veterinarian or trained canine behaviorist)
right away. While independent research can certainly be helpful, they are the only people who are qualified to give you accurate and current advice regarding the physical and
mental health of your new pet.

We sincerely hope that the days to come are as fun and exciting for you as it is for your newly adopted family member.

REMEMBER, GOOD DOGS COME
FROM GOOD TEACHERS!

– The Nutrience Team

A SMOOTH LANDING

Transitioning from one home to another can be confusing and stressful for a dog. What we call the “smooth landing” factor is all about making your pet feel at home in their new surroundings as quickly as possible. Ensuring a “smooth landing” can be fairly easy:

DO

  • Ask for a toy or blanket you can take home with you so your new friend has some familiar objects and smells to comfort them as they get used to their new surroundings.

 

  • Create a safe, secure area in your home for them to stay in when you aren’t around – you could install gates and barriers or purchase a special dog crate, appropriate for the size of your dog.

 

  • Set aside a few days after the adoption to bond with your new dog. Your presence will be comforting to them.

 

  • Make sure hazardous items and keepsakes are kept out of reach.

 

  • Pick up a few treats and new toys from your local pet store.

 

  • Give them lots of praise or “good” behaviors.

Don't

  • Leave your new dog unsupervised with young children and other pets.

 

  • Allow your dog to roam free outdoors until you are 100% sure they will return.

 

  • Punish them or yell when they do something wrong – teach a replacement behavior instead. They are eager
    to please, and will learn
    the “correct” behavior quickly.

 

  • Overwhelm them by introducing them to too many new people or things at once.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT PRODUCTS

Of course, having the right training, feeding and grooming tools on hand will make this transitional period much more enjoyable for everybody.

There are literally thousands of pet products available on the market today for dogs of all sizes, personalities and breeds – but don’t let the vast array of choices overwhelm you; just ask a sales associate at your local pet store for help. They’ll be able to point you in the right direction.

Essentials

• Collar with identification
• Leash or walking harness
• Food and water bowls
• Bed or crate
• Dog food, chews and treats
• A variety of toys – choose a few to find out what your new friend likes best!
• Doggy first aid kit (ask your vet for a list of essential items)

Useful Additions

• Waste collection bags
• Grooming tools: brushes, shampoo and conditioner, nail clippers, etc.
• Doggy toothpaste and toothbrush (or tooth cleaning finger mitt)
• An “accident” kit – enzymatic cleaners, extra training pads
• A carrier (useful for toy
or small breed dogs)

CREATURE COMFORTS

One of the first things you’ll want to do is ensure that your new dog has a place to relax and sleep. This will mean choosing between a pet bed and a crate. Of course, if you have the space and the budget, you could choose to have both as well.

The benefits of a pet bed are obvious – for you it means less dog hair on the couch, and for your furry friend it means his own place to lounge wherever you put it.
On the other hand, dog crates, available in many standard sizes, are safe arbors for pups that need some quiet time, and can aid in housebreaking. They also provide protection against indiscriminate chewing on table legs, carpets and your favorite pair of shoes while you are out of the house.

Crates are:

• A great option for puppies or dogs who are not housebroken yet
• Good for dogs with separation anxiety or a high drive to chew
• Useful for when you’re out for prolonged periods of time

HOUSEBREAKING

The golden rule is to never give your new dog the chance to have an accident in the house. Easier said than done, we know, but if you follow these guidelines, you’re more likely to prevent any mishaps.

Most importantly, remember to give them loads of praise when they go outside! We know, it seems odd, but they love the positive attention and they do want to please you. And they’ll want to please you even more if they get a treat for doing it – no surprises there.

It’s also important to note that puppies and smaller dogs will need to go out more frequently. Typically, a puppy of 1 month needs to go out approximately every 1 to 1 ½ hours and a puppy of 2 months of age needs to go out every 2 to 2 ½ hours. As they get older, they will be able to hold it for longer periods. If you plan on being away for longer periods of time, you might want to consider crating them, or consider using a training pad taped to the floor. Dogs don’t like to go potty where they sleep unless they really have to, so the crate will get them used to holding it indoors. But don’t leave them crated for too long – it’s no magic box.

Sometimes, despite our best efforts, accidents do happen… when this happens, resist the urge to scold them. Instead, take them outdoors as quickly as possible, and give them praise for finishing outside.

If there is an accident, enzymatic cleaners will help you clean up. These products eliminate organic matter in urine and feces, which should reduce your friend’s instinctive urge to “return to the scene of the crime.”

RULE OF THUMB: TAKE YOUR DOG OUT...

  • MORNING & LAST THING BEFORE YOU GO TO BED

 

  • 10 MINUTES AFTER EACH MEAL

 

  • RIGHT AFTER ACTIVE PLAY

SAFETY FIRST

Your new pet is likely very curious and eager to explore their new home. While you want them to explore and get to know their surroundings, you also want to make sure that they don’t get into any dangerous situations. Here are some things you can do around the house to make sure they don’t get into any trouble.

 

Make sure any dangerous household objects, such as electrical cords or sharp tools, are placed out of reach of a curious dog; same goes for any fragile keepsakes you want to make sure are protected. A good rule of thumb is to get on your hands and knees (literally!) and look at your house from the viewpoint of a dog. Anything that could be potentially dangerous should be kept well out of reach of your new pup.

• Do some research on common household plants and substances that might be dangerous to your dog, and ensure that they are locked away.

• Make sure the collar you purchase for them has identification,
and is the correct weight and width for their size – it should be loose enough to fit two fingers underneath, but not so loose that it can get caught or come off easily.

• Consider a fence or radio fence if you have a yard to ensure that
they don’t wander off onto busy streets.

• Consider microchipping your dog in case they get lost.

PLAYTIME, EXERCISE & SOCIALIZATION

Because dogs are active, curious creatures, they need plenty of mental and physical stimulation.

The amount of exercise, play and socialization will depend on the age, breed, and personality of your dog. Giving them the proper amount of physical and mental stimulation will ensure that they stay fit, have a proper outlet for all of their exuberant energy, and will keep them out of trouble.

Playtime is all about keeping your dog mentally alert.

FETCHING/PLAYING BALL

Harnesses the retrieval instincts of dogs.

CHEWING

Stimulates the natural urge to keep teeth clean and sharp, so provide your dog with some interesting chew toys; always supervise playtime with toys. If you believe your dog has ingested any inedible parts of toys, please consult your veterinarian right away.

SOLVING “PUZZLES”

Helps improve mental acuity and relieve boredom. For example, a hollow toy filled with treats that has to be moved a certain way to release the treats can keep them entertained for hours on end.

TRICK TRAINING

Helps improve mental acuity and relieve boredom. For example, a hollow toy filled with treats that has to be moved a certain way to release the treats can keep them entertained for hours on end.

In addition to play, exercise is an important aspect of a dog’s life. It helps dogs, as it does us, to stay fit and strong; it also allows them to explore the world outside their home and satisfy their need to patrol their territory. Every dog is different. Some prefer leisurely walks while others love to run on turbo speed. You should adjust the amount of exercise to suit the energy level and age of your pet. Remember, a tired dog is a happy dog!

Socialization is key to developing your dog’s personality. It is the process by which a dog learns to relate to people and other animals. While breed type can play a part in your dog’s personality, it is, for the most part how your dog is socialized that will define his or her character. The goal is for them to be trusting, calm, and friendly and be able to adapt to different situations.

The earlier you can start the better, as after 5 months old, dogs become increasingly more difficult to socialize. Some activities that may help in their development include:

Taking part in a basic obedience class in a group setting
to get used to other dogs and people.

• Slowly and gradually introducing your dog to new sounds,
such as the vacuum cleaner, lawn mower, cars and trucks.

• Going out with your dog to different parts of your neighborhood
– for example, on the street, in dog parks, or to community events.

NUTRITION

Ever hear the saying, “great abs are made in the kitchen?” Well, even for your pet, a healthy lifestyle begins with what you put in the bowl™. Don’t underestimate the importance of choosing a quality food. Reading the labels on pet food is just as important as reading the labels on human food – if you wouldn’t eat it yourself, chances are you probably shouldn’t give it to them either.

SELECTING A FOOD FOR YOUR NEW PET

When choosing a high quality food for your pet, here’s a handy checklist that will help you make the right choice:

SAY YES TO:

ANIMAL PROTEIN:

Dogs are carnivores first and foremost, so look for quality animal protein as the first ingredient. The more varied the protein, the better the amino acid profile.

QUALITY CARBOHYDRATES:

Commercial dog food formulas will contain carbohydrates such as grains, legumes or starchy tubers. While they are all good sources of dietary fiber, for a more premium-quality food look for one made with low-glycemic carbohydrates such as sweet potatoes, chickpeas or oats.

HEALTHY FATS:

There are two key things you’ll want to look for when it comes to fats – first, a rich source of omega fatty acids such as flaxseed or salmon oil; second, a fat whose source is named and familiar, such as “chicken” fat or “duck” fat.

FRUITS, VEGETABLES & BOTANICALS:

Rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients, the addition of these will help boost the immune system.

NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS:

While these are not essential to your pet’s diet, some supplements can even further benefit their health such as glucosamine and chondroitin to support joint health, and prebiotics and probiotics to improve digestion.

SAY NO TO:

BY-PRODUCTS:

Quality food will include recognizable proteins sourced from reliable, safe suppliers. Avoid “mystery” proteins (e.g. “meat meal”) and by-products.

GLUTEN MEALS:

Plant glutens (often listed as wheat gluten meal or corn gluten meal) are not easily digestible or bioavailable to your pet, nd provide little nutritional benefit beyond spiking the protein content of a food.

CHEAP, HIGH-GLYCEMIC GRAINS:

Avoid foods made with wheat or corn, especially if they’re high on the ingredient panel.

INGREDIENT SPLITTING:

Some companies often split unwanted ingredients and fillers into different components, so they appear further down the list. For example, they might split “whole corn” and “ground corn…” either way, its still corn, which provides little nutritional benefit.

ARTIFICIAL COLOURS AND FLAVOURS:

These are added to poor quality foods with low natural meat content to improve the look and taste of the food, which your pet may find offensive otherwise.

SWITCHING YOUR PET’S FOOD

If you’re planning to switch your pet’s food, you should avoid switching it abruptly, as this can cause stomach upset and diarrhea. Coming into a new home is quite enough change for them as is; aim to introduce the new food of your choice gradually:

Start with 25% new food and 75% old food; slowly change the proportion over the next 5 to 7 days by gradually increasing the amount of new food while decreasing the old.

Ideally, try and keep your dog on a feeding schedule – you can usually find the feeding instructions on your bag of pet food. If you’re unsure about the frequency or portion size, your veterinarian should be able to help you out.

KEEPING YOUR PET HYDRATED

It’s important to have fresh, clean water available at all times. In addition, canned food is another way to help keep your pet hydrated – while it doesn’t replace drinking water, it’s high in moisture (about 75-80% as opposed to about 10% in dry food) and can be a tasty option for pets that have a low thirst drive.

DOCTOR’S ORDERS

No matter the age of your dog, it’s important that you make your first appointment with the vet as soon as possible. To help ensure that your dog enjoys a long and healthy life, they need regular checkups, scheduled vaccinations, and parasite medication appropriate for their age and size. If you are unsure of which vet to go to, a good place to start would be to ask friends and family who have dogs for referrals to a reliable veterinarian with solid references and credentials. Don’t worry if you have a lot of questions for the vet in the beginning – we’ve all been there!

THE IMPORTANCE OF SPAYING/NEUTERING YOUR PET

Having your dog neutered is a simple surgical procedure that prevents them from having unwanted litters and helps alleviate pet overpopulation. Often, if you adopt an adult dog from a rescue, the procedure will be included in the adoption fee; if you are adopting a puppy and have no plans to breed, you should talk to your vet about the timing of the spay or neuter to ensure they get the care they need.

PARASITE PREVENTION

Parasites, such as fleas, ticks and worms can harm a dog, and can harbor communicable diseases such as Lyme disease. Therefore, you should pay special attention during high risk seasons, and administer preventative medications according to your vet’s recommendations. If you want more information on common parasites, your vet should be able to provide you with all the information you need.

DENTAL CARE & GROOMING

While regular veterinary care is certainly important, regular care at home is also important to the health of your pet.

 

DENTAL CARE

Tooth decay is a major problem for dogs, and oral disease is a frequently diagnosed health problem. Be sure to include regular dental care throughout their life so that they get used to having their teeth cleaned on a regular basis. Your vet should be able to give you tips on how best to clean your dog’s teeth.

GROOMING

Whether you D.I.Y. or have a professional do it, regular grooming helps your dog stay clean and feeling their best. It’s also a great way to have them become comfortable to the human touch, while allowing you to check their skin and coat for any unusual bumps or spots.
Be sure to include regular bathing and brushing in your pet’s grooming routine. Regular brushing will help remove dead hair, dirt and debris, and reduce shedding for a healthier looking coat.

Generally, a dog’s nails should be clipped once a month. Walking outside also helps keep nails at a healthy length. Cutting nails can be tricky, so if you’ve never done it or are unsure on how to do it properly, consult your veterinarian or a qualified groomer.